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Brasil plans to propose South Atlantic whale sanctuary


BRASILIA, May 9, 1998. Reuters News Service reports that Brasil plans to propose the creation of a whale sanctuary in the South Atlantic at a meeting next week of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the country's Foreign Ministry said.

'With the proposal to create a South Atlantic sanctuary, the idea is to guarantee the protection of various species of large whales in the mating areas and stimulate scientific research,' the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

Norway allows whale meat to be exported


According to the 'Fish Info Service', Norway is surreptitiously allowing the export of whale meat. Fish Info Service reports that 'despite Norway's self-imposed ban on the export of whale meat, whale meat and sausages are being openly sold in a duty free shop in Oslo airport's departure lounge.

When Norway resumed commercial whaling in 1993 it said that there where no plans for export and, when asked, Norwegian officials said they where unaware of the airport sales.

Germany supports resumption of whaling?


Reports indicate that the German Government has done an astonishing U turn on the conservation of whales. Despite the fact that, in 1996, the German Parliament called upon the Government to 'continue to take a strong stance in favour of the protection of whale stocks', a statement from the German Government now reveals that Germany will consider supporting a proposal by Ireland which would result in the resumption of commercial whaling. The Irish Proposal will be tabled next week at the 5Oth annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) in Oman.

Reprieve for bottlenose whales in the Gully, Nova Scotia


The Gully is a large submarine canyon on the edge of the continental shelf off Nova Scotia, Canada. It is a primary habitat for a small population of northern bottlenose whales and is used by many other cetaceans. WDCS has been funding the research work of Dr. Hal Whitehead, who has been studying the whales for a number of years.

The area is also of intense interest to oil and gas companies. The large Sable Offshore Energy Program is currently starting development (including a gas pipeline to the mainland) about 30km away.

BBC news story on WDCS and military dolphins


To view a BBC news report on the Pentagon's attempt to break into WDCS's computers in search of a report on military dolphins please click on the link below.

Norwegian 'Pirate' commercial fleet set sail for another season


Today, the 4th May 1998, Norwegian whalers commence another season of 'pirate' whaling. This year, some 36 vessels have been granted official approval to participate in the hunt of 671 minke whales.

Norway continues to whale under objection to the 1982 International Whaling Commission (IWC) decision to set zero quotas on all commercial whaling.

The Norwegian Government has allocated a maximum quota to each vessel, ranging from 13 to 40, with vessels hunting in up to five areas: the North Sea, the Barents Sea, Spitsbergen, Vestfjorden, and Jan Mayen.

WDCS Press Release 'US Military Source attempts to break into UK Charity Computer System'

Date: 2nd May 1998 19:30GMT

US Military Source attempts to break into UK Charity Computer System

On the 28th April 1998, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS) world-wide-web site recorded three unsuccessful attempts to access confidential information stored on a WDCS server.

The abortive attempt to penetrate the WDCS computer system was initiated at 20:45:09 GMT and ceased some 45 seconds after initial contact.

SeaWorld phases out orcas....?


Unfortunately, only in its logo not from its tanks.

In March 1998, SeaWorld launched a new corporate image for the new millennium, two dorsal fin shapes, looking more like two waves. What is extremely interesting is that the previously central SeaWorld logo image, of killer whales and dolphins, has been dropped.

Hope at last for right whale on a collision course with extinction


The northern right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, is the rarest whale in the world, with just 300 whales remaining on the western side of North America, and just a handful in the Northeast Atlantic and North Pacific. The species has been severely depleted in the past by commercial whaling and, because of their low reproductive rate, are struggling to survive or recover. Right whales frequent coastal waters and this places them at high risk of threats posed by human interactions. It is also notoriously docile and a slow swimmer.

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