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Begging for food from fishermen may be harming dolphins

Researchers at Savannah State University in the US have concluded that dolphins foraging for fish stuck in or stirred up by the long, submerged nets of local shrimp trawlers are passing on this knowledge and behaviour to other dolphins in their group.

Hello there! Whale’s leap to let others know they are around

Seeing a whale leap (breach) out of the water and come crashing back down again is just one of the amazing rituals that cause us to marvel at these fascinating creatures. But why do whales do it?

According to new research conducted by biologist Ailbhe S. Kavanagh at the University of Queensland, Australia, breaching is a way of saying 'hello'!

World's most endangered porpoise a step nearer extinction

The latest survey to find out how many vaquitas, a type of porpoise only found in the northern part of the Gulf of California, have revealed that there may be as few as just 30 individuals left.

A survey last summer using acoustic techniques to pick up the sounds made by the porpoises discovered just half as many creatures as researchers has estimated to remain just a year earlier.

Eavesdropping on dolphin chat

A new project has been set up that will listen in on whale and dolphin activity in order to protect them and their homes.

Scientists from Northern Ireland's Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI) plan to eavesdrop on marine mammals around the Irish and Scottish coasts using a network of sophisticated underwater monitoring devices.

Dolphin dies at zoo in Greece

One of the four dolphins that were transferred from a marine park in Finland to one in Greece last summer has died.

The bottlenose dolphin, known as 'Delphi', was thought to be around 37 years old. An initial autopsy has indicated that the cause of death was heart failure.

Scientists find answers to whale mysteries in err…earwax!

We still know relatively little about whales and dolphins, which is one good reason why we should be protecting them, but finding out more about their secret lives sometimes comes from the strangest source.

Old samples of earwax from whales held for decades at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History are now revealing huge amounts of interesting data about the watery world in which these creatures lived hundreds of years ago.

Hundreds of dolphins captured in Taiji

A 'superpod' of around 300 dolphins has been captured by hunters in the cove near the infamous town of Taiji, Japan. Since their capture, the dolphins are being subject to a selection process by divers who will decide which dolphins should be sold to marine parks and those that will be slaughtered. The dolphins can fetch over £20,000 when sold to the captivity industry.

Footage of the capture, and subsequent abuse, has been live streamed by welfare groups working in Taiji in the hope that something might be done to prevent this annual slaughter.

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