News and blogs

News

Smart dolphins prefer dangerous meals dead not alive

Researchers from Murdoch University working off the coast of Western Australia have been analysing how and why dolphins shake and throw some prey before eating it.

In the case of octopus, the study revealed that the technique used by the dolphins swimming off the Bunbury coast can be adopted for any dangerous meal.  

The dolphins have worked out that if they eat an octopus alive, the suckers on its leg could stick to their throats and cause the dolphin to choke and die.

Why are whales so big?

A new report published by The Royal Society looks at the reasons behind how modern day whales evolved to be so much bigger than their ancestors.

Scientists examined the lengths of over 60 extinct baleen whales, based on measurements of their skulls, and compared these with 13 existing baleen whales.

No whales are endangered according to Japanese conservation list

The recently released Japanese “Red List of Marine Creatures” has been criticized by some experts for the lack of protection it provides for whales and dolphins.

The Japanese Fisheries Agency and Ministry of the Environment compile the list, which is Japan’s own version of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List -  the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of different species.

Florida congressman calls for end to Japanese whaling

Congressman Matt Gaetz, a Republican representative from Florida, has put forward a resolution in the US House of Representatives calling for an end to Japanese whaling.

In a speech last month he praised Australia for the stance it had taken on the issue and said it was time for the US to now act. He highlighted the issue of Japan hunting whales in Antarctica for commercial purposes under the guise of scientific whaling.

Mr Gaetz wants to see the issue discussed as part of trade negotiations with Japan and will raise it with President Trump as soon as possible.

Blogs

Caithness Orca Watch week

WDC is once again participating in the annual Caithness Orca Watch week off the north coast of Scotland. Organised by the SeaWatch Foundation, the event is now in its 6th year and yesterday got off to a cracking start.

Rainbow at Last!

Today I had my first good sighting of WDC adoption star Rainbow this season, I knew she had been spotted recently by Sarah from the Ecoventures tour boat but it was great getting her and her lovely son Indigo in my cameras viewfinder again.