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New art installation highlights plastic pollution in the ocean

An artist from Singapore called Tan Zi Xi has brought the horrors of plastic pollution in the ocean to life with an amazing new art installation. Called “Plastic Ocean,” it shows how it feels to live in an ocean in which the surface is completely covered in a layer of plastic rubbish.

Working with hundreds of pieces of plastic items which are known to pollute our planet’s oceans, this installation shows viewers exactly where their single use plastic ends up and how it invades the habitat of whales, dolphins and other sea creatures.

Taiji hunters allowed to kill more whales and dolphins

Fishermen hunting whales and dolphins in Taiji, Japan have been allowed to increase the number of both melon-headed whales and rough-toothed dolphins only mid-way through the hunting season.

Both species were new to the list of those allowed to be caught in the 2017 hunt but the numbers caught already have reached the initial quota levels, so the government have agreed to raise the limit.

Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces

A worrying new study by marine scientists at the University of Plymouth has found that the problem with plastic bags entering the ocean could be a lot worst than initially thought.
Researchers have discovered that a single plastic carrier bag could be broken down by marine organisms into around 1.75 million microscopic fragments and so increasing the spread of microplastics within the marine environment.

Lolita Case Returns to Court


Orca Lolita
Lolita (Tokitae), the last surviving wild-caught Southern Resident orca

Hackers target Norway over whale hunts

The international ‘hacktivist’ group, Anonymous, which targets the internet sites of governments and other organisations, has set its sights on Norway in response to the country’s continued commercial whale hunting.

Reports have emerged from Norway that several Norwegian institutions have been targeted by the hackers who usually focus on banks and government or academic institutions.

Natural History Museum bans sale of plastic water bottles to help fight ocean pollution

London’s Natural History Museum has taken more positive steps to counter plastic pollution in the ocean by announcing a ban on the sale of single-use plastic water bottles at its two UK sites.

The museum's main building in South Kensington, London, and premises in Tring, Hertfordshire look set to do away with bottles and offer visitors alternatives such as water fountains and reusable bottles, as well as looking at ways to encourage visitors to bring their own bottles. It has already stopped offering plastic straws.

Marine park announces Morgan the orca is pregnant

WDC is devastated to hear that Morgan, the wild orca held at Loro Parque on Tenerife in the Canary Islands, is pregnant. The news comes just a few weeks after SeaWorld, who had previously listed all the Loro Parque orcas on its own company inventory, appeared to conveniently end its association with the Tenerife park.

Whales go from 'right-handed' to left

Scientist studying blue whale feeding habits have documented a switch from ‘right-hand’ to left when these huge creatures feed.

Blue whales are similar to many other creatures when it comes to ‘handeness’ or laterality.  They tend to always favour the right. However, results from a six year study of their behaviour off the coast of southern California have revealed that the whales will swap sides when feeding.

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